effects of drug abuse and addiction pdf Friday, May 7, 2021 9:56:10 AM

Effects Of Drug Abuse And Addiction Pdf

File Name: effects of drug abuse and addiction .zip
Size: 16100Kb
Published: 07.05.2021

Substance abuse , also known as drug abuse , is use of a drug in amounts or by methods which are harmful to the individual or others. It is a form of substance-related disorder.

Substance abuse

Drug addiction, also called substance use disorder, is a disease that affects a person's brain and behavior and leads to an inability to control the use of a legal or illegal drug or medication. Substances such as alcohol, marijuana and nicotine also are considered drugs.

When you're addicted, you may continue using the drug despite the harm it causes. Drug addiction can start with experimental use of a recreational drug in social situations, and, for some people, the drug use becomes more frequent. For others, particularly with opioids, drug addiction begins with exposure to prescribed medications, or receiving medications from a friend or relative who has been prescribed the medication. The risk of addiction and how fast you become addicted varies by drug. Some drugs, such as opioid painkillers, have a higher risk and cause addiction more quickly than others.

As time passes, you may need larger doses of the drug to get high. Soon you may need the drug just to feel good. As your drug use increases, you may find that it's increasingly difficult to go without the drug.

Attempts to stop drug use may cause intense cravings and make you feel physically ill withdrawal symptoms. You may need help from your doctor, family, friends, support groups or an organized treatment program to overcome your drug addiction and stay drug-free. Sometimes it's difficult to distinguish normal teenage moodiness or angst from signs of drug use.

Possible indications that your teenager or other family member is using drugs include:. Signs and symptoms of drug use or intoxication may vary, depending on the type of drug.

Below you'll find several examples. People use cannabis by smoking, eating or inhaling a vaporized form of the drug. Cannabis often precedes or is used along with other substances, such as alcohol or illegal drugs, and is often the first drug tried. Two groups of synthetic drugs — synthetic cannabinoids and substituted or synthetic cathinones — are illegal in most states.

The effects of these drugs can be dangerous and unpredictable, as there is no quality control and some ingredients may not be known. Synthetic cannabinoids, also called K2 or Spice, are sprayed on dried herbs and then smoked, but can be prepared as an herbal tea. Despite manufacturer claims, these are chemical compounds rather than "natural" or harmless products. These drugs can produce a "high" similar to marijuana and have become a popular but dangerous alternative.

Substituted cathinones, also called "bath salts," are mind-altering psychoactive substances similar to amphetamines such as ecstasy MDMA and cocaine. Packages are often labeled as other products to avoid detection. Despite the name, these are not bath products such as Epsom salts.

Substituted cathinones can be eaten, snorted, inhaled or injected and are highly addictive. These drugs can cause severe intoxication, which results in dangerous health effects or even death. Barbiturates, benzodiazepines and hypnotics are prescription central nervous system depressants. They're often used and misused in search for a sense of relaxation or a desire to "switch off" or forget stress-related thoughts or feelings.

Stimulants include amphetamines, meth methamphetamine , cocaine, methylphenidate Ritalin, Concerta, others and amphetamine-dextroamphetamine Adderall, Adderall XR, others. They are often used and misused in search of a "high," or to boost energy, to improve performance at work or school, or to lose weight or control appetite.

Club drugs are commonly used at clubs, concerts and parties. These drugs are not all in the same category, but they share some similar effects and dangers, including long-term harmful effects. Because GHB and flunitrazepam can cause sedation, muscle relaxation, confusion and memory loss, the potential for sexual misconduct or sexual assault is associated with the use of these drugs. Use of hallucinogens can produce different signs and symptoms, depending on the drug. Signs and symptoms of inhalant use vary, depending on the substance.

Some commonly inhaled substances include glue, paint thinners, correction fluid, felt tip marker fluid, gasoline, cleaning fluids and household aerosol products. Due to the toxic nature of these substances, users may develop brain damage or sudden death. Opioids are narcotic, painkilling drugs produced from opium or made synthetically.

This class of drugs includes, among others, heroin, morphine, codeine, methadone and oxycodone. Sometimes called the "opioid epidemic," addiction to opioid prescription pain medications has reached an alarming rate across the United States. Some people who've been using opioids over a long period of time may need physician-prescribed temporary or long-term drug substitution during treatment.

If your drug use is out of control or causing problems, get help. The sooner you seek help, the greater your chances for a long-term recovery. Talk with your primary doctor or see a mental health professional, such as a doctor who specializes in addiction medicine or addiction psychiatry, or a licensed alcohol and drug counselor. If you're not ready to approach a doctor, help lines or hotlines may be a good place to learn about treatment.

You can find these lines listed on the internet or in the phone book. People struggling with addiction usually deny that their drug use is problematic and are reluctant to seek treatment. An intervention presents a loved one with a structured opportunity to make changes before things get even worse and can motivate someone to seek or accept help. An intervention should be carefully planned and may be done by family and friends in consultation with a doctor or professional such as a licensed alcohol and drug counselor, or directed by an intervention professional.

It involves family and friends and sometimes co-workers, clergy or others who care about the person struggling with addiction. During the intervention, these people gather together to have a direct, heart-to-heart conversation with the person about the consequences of addiction and ask him or her to accept treatment.

Like many mental health disorders, several factors may contribute to development of drug addiction. The main factors are:. Physical addiction appears to occur when repeated use of a drug changes the way your brain feels pleasure. The addicting drug causes physical changes to some nerve cells neurons in your brain. Neurons use chemicals called neurotransmitters to communicate. These changes can remain long after you stop using the drug. People of any age, sex or economic status can become addicted to a drug.

Certain factors can affect the likelihood and speed of developing an addiction:. Drug use can have significant and damaging short-term and long-term effects. Taking some drugs can be particularly risky, especially if you take high doses or combine them with other drugs or alcohol.

Here are some examples. The best way to prevent an addiction to a drug is not to take the drug at all. If your doctor prescribes a drug with the potential for addiction, use care when taking the drug and follow the instructions provided by your doctor. Doctors should prescribe these medications at safe doses and amounts and monitor their use so that you're not given too great a dose or for too long a time.

If you feel you need to take more than the prescribed dose of a medication, talk to your doctor. Once you've been addicted to a drug, you're at high risk of falling back into a pattern of addiction. If you do start using the drug, it's likely you'll lose control over its use again — even if you've had treatment and you haven't used the drug for some time. Drug addiction substance use disorder care at Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Don't delay your care at Mayo Clinic Schedule your appointment now for safe in-person care.

This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Overview Drug addiction, also called substance use disorder, is a disease that affects a person's brain and behavior and leads to an inability to control the use of a legal or illegal drug or medication. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic.

Share on: Facebook Twitter. Show references Substance-related and addictive disorders. Arlington, Va. Accessed July 17, Brown A. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 24, Understanding drug use and addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed Aug. Your brain and addiction.

National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens. Drugs, brains, and behavior: The science of addiction. Commonly abused drugs. Misuse of prescription drugs. Lessons from prevention research.

Treatment approaches for drug addiction. Principles of drug addiction treatment: A research-based guide third edition. Ventura AS, et al. To improve substance use disorder prevention, treatment and recovery: Engage the family.

The Causes and Effects of Drug Addiction

Drug addiction, also called substance use disorder, is a disease that affects a person's brain and behavior and leads to an inability to control the use of a legal or illegal drug or medication. Substances such as alcohol, marijuana and nicotine also are considered drugs. When you're addicted, you may continue using the drug despite the harm it causes. Drug addiction can start with experimental use of a recreational drug in social situations, and, for some people, the drug use becomes more frequent. For others, particularly with opioids, drug addiction begins with exposure to prescribed medications, or receiving medications from a friend or relative who has been prescribed the medication. The risk of addiction and how fast you become addicted varies by drug. Some drugs, such as opioid painkillers, have a higher risk and cause addiction more quickly than others.


trying to address the myriad problems faced by patients in need of treatment for drug abuse or addiction. Addiction affects multiple brain circuits, including those.


What are the effects of drug abuse?

This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations. Callers can also order free publications and other information. English and Spanish are available if you select the option to speak with a national representative. The referral service is free of charge. If you have no insurance or are underinsured, we will refer you to your state office, which is responsible for state-funded treatment programs.

Drug misuse, abuse, and addiction can all lead to both short-term and long-term health effects. The effects of drug abuse depend on the type of drug, any other substances that a person is using, and their health history. Drugs are chemical compounds that affect the mind and body. The exact effects vary among individuals and also depend on the drug, dosage, and delivery method.

Check out our interactive infographic to see progress toward the Substance Abuse objectives and other Healthy People topic areas. Reduce substance abuse to protect the health, safety, and quality of life for all, especially children.

Drug Use and Addiction

Research shows. You probably know that drugs affect feelings and moods, judgment, decision making, learning, and memory. Some of these effects occur when drugs are used at high doses or after prolonged use, and some may occur after just one use. But it is not only injection drug users who risk contracting or spreading infections. Mental Health Effects Drug abuse might affect an existing mental disorder or result in one.

People who have not struggled with substance abuse may find it difficult to understand why anyone would start using. There are, in fact, many reasons why some people turn to or start abusing drugs, and unfortunately the consequences can be life-shattering. While every case is unique, there are general patterns that indicate why some people use drugs, how addiction develops, and the consequences of drug abuse.


Drug misuse, abuse, and addiction can all lead to both short-term and long-term health effects. The Diagnostic and.


People from all walks of life can experience problems with their drug use, regardless of age, race, background, or the reason they started using drugs in the first place. Some people experiment with recreational drugs out of curiosity, to have a good time, because friends are doing it, or to ease problems such as stress, anxiety, or depression. Prescription medications such as painkillers, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers can cause similar problems. In fact, next to marijuana, prescription painkillers are the most abused drugs in the U.

Drug Abuse and Addiction

4 Comments

Laurence M. 09.05.2021 at 16:02

Explains how substance abuse treatment works, how family interventions can be a first step It's Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB) to children whose parents or friends' parents might have substance abuse problems.

Teodequilda H. 11.05.2021 at 01:09

Clinically known as substance use disorder, drug abuse or addiction is caused by the habitual taking of addictive substances. Drugs include alcohol, marijuana,​.

Patsy A. 11.05.2021 at 09:57

How does science provide solutions for drug abuse and addiction? Scientists study the effects that drugs have on the brain and on people's behavior. They use​.

Fabricio G. 15.05.2021 at 22:14

New york city subway map pdf download barefoot investor ebook pdf free

LEAVE A COMMENT